Christmas Kanikapila Tour: Herb Ohta Jr., Keoki Kahumoku, Chino Montero

Christmas Kanikapila Tour: Herb Ohta Jr., Keoki Kahumoku, Chino Montero

Iaorana Te Otea

Friday, December 14

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm (event ends at 9:00 pm)

Lotte Lehman Concert Hall - UCSB

Santa Barbara, CA

$25.00 - $30.00

Herb Ohta Jr.
Herb Ohta Jr.
An international recording artist, Herb is considered to be one of today’s most accomplished `ukulele masters.’ Influenced by Jazz, R&B, Latin and Brazilian music, Herb puts his stamp on Hawaiian music by pushing the limits of tone and technique on this versatile and beautiful instrument. The son of ‘ukulele legend Ohta-san,’ Herb Junior started playing the instrument at the age of three, and teaching it at the age of 9.

Ohta now shares the music of Hawaii, and the beauty of the ukulele with Hawaiian music enthusiasts around the world, performing in concerts and conducting instructional workshops. This Na Hoku Hanohano Award winner (Hawaiian equivalent to the Grammy) and four-time Hawaii Music Award winner effortlessly translates the beauty and culture of Hawaii through his creative musical expression.

With nine solo albums and eight duet albums in circulation, and contributions on more than 40 other recordings, Herb is on his way to matching his father’s legacy. In 2010 Herb celebrated his 20th Anniversary in the music industry by releasing two new recordings, `Ukulele Nahenahe’ and ‘Take 1.’ In 2011, `Ukulele Nahenahe’ won the Hawaii Music Award for ‘Best Ukulele Recording’ and also won the Na Hoku Hanohano Award for ‘Best Instrumental.
Keoki Kahumoku
Keoki Kahumoku
This fifth generation award winning slack-key guitarist & recording artist began performing with his father, George Kahumoku, Jr. in 1990 at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. Later, Keoki moved to of Maui where he performed around the island including the Westin & Kapalua Bay Hotels.

Possessing a special talent for teaching, Keoki began classes at home and at various educational institutions including the Queen Liliuokalani Children Center, Maui Community College, King Kekaulike High School, Haleakala Waldorf School and a myriad of other places inspiring students of all ages. In 1995, he started the Annual Youth ‘Ukulele Players Contest at the Hula Grill which continues to this day. He continues to teach private lessons from his present home in Hilo on the Big Island through his non-profit, the Center for Hawaiian Music Studies. His professional students include the Slack Key Show’s Ukulele Boyz (Peter deAquino & Garrett Probst) and Hoku Award winning Brittni Paiva.
Keoki has recorded with his father in Ho‘oilina – The Legacy, with Herb Ohta, Jr. on Hawaiian from the Heart and Treasures of Aloha.
Keoki’s solo CD, Liko, contains a wonderful mix of contemporary Hawaiian, ki ho’alu, ‘ukulele, and a hint of blues and was nominated for Best Slack Key in the Hawai‘i Music Awards. His latest solo CD, Rise & Shine features many Kahumoku family songs.

Keoki is a farmer, hunter, & fisherman. Equally comfortable cooking for a crowd or performing for them, Keoki draws his inspiration from his Hawaiian roots. Like his dad, Keoki’s performance is as much about his relaxed, engaging “talk story” as it is about his wide ranging traditional and contemporary Hawaiian repertoire.

Keoki earned a Hoku Award for producing Best Compilation for Hula! Big Island Style – Various Artists.
He is also an artist on 5 Grammy winning Best Hawaiian Music CDs:
2005 Slack Key Guitar Volume 2 - 47th Grammy Awards winner
2006 Masters of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar, Volume 1 - 48th Grammy Awards winner
2007 Legends of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar – Live from Maui – 49th Grammy Awards winner
2008 Treasures of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar - 50th Grammy Awards winner
2009 The Spirit of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar – 51st Grammy Award nominee
2010 Masters of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar, Volume 2 52nd Grammy Award winner
Chino Montero
Chino Montero
2011 GRAMMY Nominee Chino Montero is one of the most accomplished and in-demand guitarists in Hawaii. He has been featured on five GRAMMY Nominated recordings in the Best Hawaiian Music Album Category. His latest release is a collaboration with four other celebrated guitarists and the top-selling female vocalist in the history of Hawaiian music Amy Hanaiali'i.

David “Chino” Montero is recognized as one of Hawaii’s most talented guitarists and falsetto vocalists. He has performed and recorded with many of Hawaii’s top artists and was a founding member of the popular trio Palolo. His music has been featured on four GRAMMY Nominated recordings in 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2010. He has toured in China, Japan, Brazil, Tahiti, and Across the US. Highlights include venues in Germany opening for Carlos Santana, The House of Blues in Chicago and Dallas, The Schermerhorn Symphony Center with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, and the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai, China.
Iaorana Te Otea
Iaorana Te Otea
Iaorana Te Otea (which is Tahitian for "greetings from the drum beats") was founded in 1990 by a group of UCSB students. Since then, we have celebrated the dynamic cultures of the Polynesian islands. Our club is multicultural and diverse with members from several different backgrounds and varying in experience. We welcome those who share a vested interest in learning about the Polynesian culture. Our purpose is to educate our community and ourselves, provide insight to those who are unfamiliar with Polynesian culture, and most of all, enjoy our music and dance.

We mainly perform two different types of Polynesian dances: the hula and the ote'a. The hula is a dance form accompanied by chant or song. It was developed in the Hawaiian islands by the Polynesians who originally settled there. The chant or song is called an aparima. The aparima is also known as the "Tahitian hula" and it literally means the kiss of the hands, or to tell a story with the hands. Hula encompasses an enormous variety of styles and moods, ranging from solemn or sacred to playful and energetic. Aparimas may recount legends and the history of the islands, praise Polynesian gods, offer a prayer, seduce someone, praise a lover, or tell a love story.

An ote'a is a traditional Tahitian dance performed and also directly linked with all aspects of life. One would dance for joy, to welcome a visitor, to pray to a god, to challenge an enemy, or to seduce a mate. The dance is set to music only. Drums are usually the main instrument, but there is no singing. For the men, the themes can be chosen from warfare or sailing, and then they may use spears or paddles. For women the themes are closer to home, such as themes from nature, combing their hair, or the flight of a butterfly (more elaborate themes may also be chosen). In a proper ote'a the story of the theme should pervade the whole dance.
Venue Information:
Lotte Lehman Concert Hall - UCSB
UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA, 93106
http://www.music.ucsb.edu/about/maps